June 2017

The Seneca Falls Convention of 1848 (from "Have To History")

Seneca FallsElizabeth Cady Stanton, who was a Quaker, and Lucretia Mott, who was not, were part of a group who travelled to London to take part in the first World’s Anti-Slavery Convention. While allowed to attend, they were forced to sit in the balcony and could not speak or participate. The decided that if women were to have meaningful impact in various other areas of reform, they would first need a little social and political efficacy of their own.

The Great Depression / The Dust Bowl (from "Have To" History)

Black Tuesday NewspaperOn October 29, 1929, the bottom fell out of the stock market. There’d been signs – the previous Thursday had almost been the day, but a handful of big money types shored up confidence by buying shares in major industries at well-above market value. It didn’t hold. “Black Tuesday” set off a domino effect of selling, panic, business failures, bank runs, and even a few suicides. It wasn't what you'd call a "good day" for America.

What Started the Civil War? (From "Have To" History)

Am I Not A Man...Even before declaring independence in 1776, slavery had been a controversial topic in the American colonies, but it was not a strictly North/South issue. Over time, the North became increasingly industrialized while the South grew more and more reliant on large-scale cash crops. Slavery ceased to make economic sense in the North, allowing ideological concerns to eventually prohibit it altogether.

As the cotton gin made the institution wildly profitable and seemingly essential to the South, slavery was increasingly promoted as a positive good for all involved – including the slaves themselves. 

Who Was Frederick Douglass? (From "Have To" History)

Frederick DouglassI'm trying something new – a section called "Have To" History, aimed at folks who feel like they should know stuff but don't otherwise have a natural interest. It could conceivably grow into a reference of sorts for students who've put themselves in a bad position and have limited time to try to claw their way out. We'll see.

Here's a sample post about a guy who we were recently told is doing very well for himself. I'm glad. He certainly paid his dues along the way.

Who Was Andrew Jackson? (From "Have To" History)

Andrew JacksonI'm trying something new – a section called "Have To" History, aimed at folks who feel like they should know stuff but don't otherwise have a natural interest. It could conceivably grow into a reference of sorts for students who've put themselves in a bad position and have limited time to try to claw their way out. We'll see.

Here's a sample post about a guy who couldn't possibly have prevented the Civil War because he was long-dead. (He did almost start it 30 years early, but the "Nullification Crisis" wasn't quite "Have To" enough to make the cut. Sorry, POTUS.)

A Wall of Separation: The Ten Commandments (Part Two)

10 YellowIt was in 2005 that things got really interesting. On the same day, the Supreme Court announced its decisions in both McCreary County v. ACLU of Kentucky (2005) and Van Orden v. Perry (2005) – both cases involving the Commandments on public land. While Kentucky’s displays were determined to be unconstitutional, the monument in Texas was acceptable. Both were split decisions, and the difference came down to context – both the displays themselves and the history behind them – particularly in terms of intent.

That’s where we left off last time. Now the real fun begins.